Blog

Rounders Forever

Uncategorized
Teaching and learning in rounders should be exciting for everyone involved, with rapid progress through innovative practices. I have been working with schools teaching rounders for a number of years. This has really helped me to develop a long-term plan for teaching rounders, which aims to support all pupils to be ‘the best they can be’ by challenging them through inclusive and innovative lessons. Pupils are stretched physically and mentally in each lesson at a pace suitable for them as an individual.   When differentiated, for example, I try and break this into 2 categories: physical strengths and mental capacity. You may have a player who is below average on their skills but needs to be challenged mentally, while another player may be very gifted with their physical skills, but…
Read More

Everyday Intelligence: Classroom Teacher Vs Sports Coach Specialist teaching PE…

Uncategorized
External experience blended with everyday intelligence.   I guess I might be a little bias but I 100% believe external companies are better for teaching P.E. then the everyday teacher. Now I don’t mean that in a rude way, the everyday teacher is an everyday superhero. The amount of  planning, teaching and of course, the will power to put up with the job at times is incredible.  I’ve not been involved in teaching P.E. in schools for that many years, but one thing I have learnt is if  a school was a computer the teachers are SIRI- THEY KNOW EVERYTHING and we as external  companies should never forget this, use it to our advantage. Since the Sports Plus Scheme started up in the West Midlands sports funding for outside companies  has really grown, but it’s not just about the money we aren’t all Man City mind-sets, it’s about the  extra planning and helping the start up for coaches in schools. The 2012 Olympics in London really kicked on sports/P.E. in schools. It helped the country recognise  we need to do more for the kids, offer more sports, more after school clubs and more chances for  them to be active. And this is where we come in, as specialist coaches we strive to teach the kids about all P.E.and sports in the national curriculum, ensuring we find the right challenges in order for them to keep progressing at their pace, not ours.  Unlike class teachers, we specialise solely in sports while class teachers are expected to learn everything on the curriculum. At Believe and Achieve sports we channel all our focus into mastering  every sports and making sure we know how all sports work e.g. rules and regulations.  Advice time- although we are employed as sports coaches, try to encourage other subjects into your  lesson. It can be quite hard but the children love it, it shows them you care about the rest of their  school life and children love the attention! I try to encourage maths, if you take away the classroom add in a couple of number questions, you’ll  find the perfect formula between maths and P.E. it can cause quite a divide and some children hate  maths, but the overall percentage of the class love a tricky question from time to time. (See what I  did there, it’s easy to incorporate)   I can’t sit here and say I’m more experienced than teachers at behaviour management, if anything  I’m the Harry Kane with a good couple of first years doing it, but the teachers are the Shearers, seen  it all, done it all and won it all. What I can say though is when it comes to P.E. and coaching sports I  like to say I’m pretty strong.   This leads me to my final point about being an external coaching company, to always use your  resources within school and when it comes to behaviour management, the teachers are the game  changers.   I say I hear not us, but I might be very experienced in teaching a child how to kick, how to run with  the right technique or how to run a P.E. session, but teachers work with these children every day.  They know what they react to, what works with each child, and if the children have any particular behavioural problems. So my advice is use your resources to the best of your ability but don’t ever be afraid to ask other teachers for help, because it will only help the lesson run smoothly.
Read More

Summer Term PE: Being Smart in Summer

Uncategorized
  Summer is finally here, the time of stuffy sports halls and cold concrete is over, a new era of Joe Roots, Babe Ruth’s and Paula Radcliffe’s are ready to go. As temperatures rise, the excitement for outdoor P.E. closely follows, however, with great weather comes great responsibility, safety measures must be followed! As I’ve mentioned before the weather outside can very much affect how the lesson goes, but before you even start your lesson you have to check the area in which you are teaching. It may sound silly, and of course the grass won’t exactly be Lords or Old Trafford but it must be clean of debris. You have no idea who has had access to it at evening or weekends, so just quickly go around pick up…
Read More

The Sunday Shift….Failing to Prepare Then Prepare to Fail

Uncategorized
Unlike most jobs, a teacher’s week begins on a Sunday afternoon. For me, it starts right after  morning football and goes right through to MOTD2. At the start of every term we begin a new topic. This term it is net and wall games and from the aspiration of 2016, we decided on tennis to create our own 2017 stars. Once I know what we are studying I’ll spend my first Sunday printing off all the lesson plans from the first till the final week, just in case I’m not there and another B&A Sports coach needs to know what lesson we are on.   I’ll then spend a couple hours going through the following week’s lesson plan, printing it off and  highlighting any key words, learning outcomes and challenges the children can take on.  Children learn in all different ways but I, myself have always found visual and kinetic learning the  best. This probably explains why I excelled in sports and not science, highlighting the phrases just  makes it easy for me to pick up on educational points I want the children to remember.   P.E isn’t just about being a great sportsperson, it’s about understanding the educational side; what  sport does for the body, why we exercise and of course, the healthy eating, which is huge in primary  schools. With my Sunday coming to an end and Monday getting closer, I’ll check all my necessities are packed, lesson plans, apples, water and of course an ironed uniform. My evening finishes listening to Mark, Gabbie or Gary dissecting our beloved Premier League and examining all things football. 7:00am Monday morning, it’s here and we’re live, no place for hiding it’s time to get up and face the  music. My mornings start the same as everybody else’s. Groans and moans mixed with breakfast and a  hope that it will be a good day. Despite my work only being around a 9 minute drive away I always leave myself a good half hour, just in case of traffic or more importantly if there are any schedule changes, which I can assure you there is always something. 8.30am and now the work begins, my routine starts with signing in at the office, checking if any messages or schedule changes for the week have been left for me and trust me when it comes to schools there is always something to check and keep up on. Most, if not all, the schools I work in run a breakfast club which takes place in the sports hall. I am  always very keen to help out because as a sports person I know how crucial it is for a full stomach to  run and think off. After 15 minutes of continuous stories of what every child at the club has done with their weekend, I slowly drift away into my office (equipment closet) and start my own prep.  Work is printed out, equipment is ready, breakfast is packed away and now its show time, the curtains are up, the director is ready, and all that is missing are the stars. The clock is ticking, the crowd of cones eagerly waiting for the show and I begin to act out how I want the lesson to go. Thinking of my learning objectives for both the class and individuals I make sure our challenges are fixed for all varieties of ability. Then as we near to 9:10am the room falls silent, a crescendo of sound begins through the playground and into the sports hall, this is where it all begins…
Read More

Don’t be a Clattenberg!! A Look at Behaviour Management Techniques.

Uncategorized
Before working for B&A Sports I had never really had to work on behavior management of an individual  or whole class and to be honest, I didn’t realise how hard it would be.    Whilst I was training and watching Stefan (my boss) teach a class, I noticed that he never once  shouted, didn’t even get angry, and I couldn’t believe how controlled the children were.  Stefan told me that shouting at kids will never work and it can only go two ways. The first being  you will loose the relationship with the children.     Secondly it shows you’re on the ropes and trust me you don’t want to be looking like David Haye  in the 8th round! If you let your emotions take over your calm domineer, children will notice this  and start to push boundaries, keep in control of your emotions to keep in control of your  surroundings.    I myself have always coached football, ages that have ranged from u9’s all the way through to  adult football. The big difference is that I coached people who wanted to learn football, not  everybody who walks into the sports hall wants to be the next Eni Aluko or Owen Farrell.    This was one of the first things I had to address and I noticed very early on that if children feel  disconnected to the challenge, their lack of interaction would quickly flip to bad behavior, so it’s  crucial that you must emotionally and physically show interest to them achieving the target you  have set.    Another way to help your behavior management towards the children is incorporating the class  system into P.E. the easiest way to do this is either ask the T.A. or go up into the classrooms and  ask about it.    One of the schools I work at use DOJO, which is an online points system where pupil can earn  Dojos for being good i.e. DOJO for staying on task, or they can receive a negative for not listening.     If the children know they can earn a reward for good behavior it makes it more of a game rather  than a chore. You can also offer whole class DOJO, this is great help when you need the class to  line up and they will all line up quietly as nobody wants to be the naughty one who stopped the  class DOJO.    Not all schools use the DOJO system, some will use other methods, for example another one is  house points, each pupil is put into either North, South, East or West and individuals earn house  points for end of week rewards.    A really simple system I use is the ‘invisible ball’. Whenever you’re teaching tennis, hockey or  anything that involves a ball if the children can’t keep it still I simply take the equipment from  them. Pupils quickly begin to listen as they don’t want to miss out or be bored and I can assure  that the next time they sit down with equipment they will look more a gargoyle!    Finally DON’T BE A CLATTENBERG – it’s not all about you! I know you have to be a strong figure,  but don’t ever get on a power trip and needlessly pick up on minor details. For example if you ask  children to ‘sit down, legs cross, arms folded’ and one child is sat quietly but without there legs  folded, just leave them don’t ruin a good lesson by brandishing big tellings off.     If you have the attention of the children that’s all you need, remember it’s their P.E. time not your  big show. 
Read More

IT’S A 10 FROM LEN:

Blogs
Dance was our next wall to knock down with the children, and what better way to knock it down than with the aggressive and intimidating HAKA dance. As spring started children at Believe and Achieve schools began learning the art of dance and its many wonderful forms. I picked the loudest, most hard hitting and scary dance. Sound stupid? Of course but kids love to be loud so at least let them blend it with dance. Unlike gymnastics I wanted to show the children visually what this dance looked like, we used YouTube to search the New Zealand rugby team and what the HAKA war dance stood for. Before you knew it all the kids in school were “HAAAAA”ing, “HOOOO”ing and “AHHHH”ing across school .All they needed were the rugby…
Read More

Primary School Gymnastics

Blogs
  Olympic standard: Preparation for Tokyo 2020 In autumn Believe and Achieve Sports schools began preparing for the 2020 Olympic games in Tokyo, well Gymnastics as the lessons plans titled but still aspirations were high Both Key stage 1 and 2 started their gymnastics adventure with a group discussion of what comes to mind when they think about gymnastics? What makes a good gymnast? Had any of them had experience in gymnastics? And what they were most excited about learning, most of course wanted the mats and to start rolling. Early years began by self-exploring what the children could do with their bodies, we looked at making shapes i.e. letters, utilizing space and what balancing is. After a couple more weeks of varied movements, looking at balance, how animals move…
Read More